Gyrl Gaze: Vivian Fu

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My favourite thing about photography and the digital age today is the vulnerability and closeness that artists have in their work; there’s a link between the digital age and the ability and freedom to convey intimacy, through photography, from the artist to the viewer the way Vivian Fu does. I’ve admired Vivian Fu’s self-portraits and clear photography style since January of last year and when the opportunity came, I wanted to ring in the new year by interviewing her about her work and identity. Have a read…

As if introducing yourself to the world for the first time, could you tells us who you are and what you do?

My name is Vivian Fu and i’m a sleepy artist.

When and how did your relationship with photography start?

I started taking photos when my parents gave me a polaroid izone camera, but I think i regularly started taking photos and making it a part of my life when I was in middle school. My parents were pretty strict and I wasn’t allowed to go out that often, so I spent a lot of time at home and I would borrow my dad’s digital camera and taking photos. I had an hour of internet time each day and I would spend it on flickr and livejournal looking into other people’s lives and at other people’s work. I came to photography around the same time I started using the internet, so my understanding of both is really influenced by the other.

How do you take your struggles with identity and culture and portray them in your photos?

I wouldn’t say that my photographs are specifically about struggle with identity and culture, but it’s definitely something that I think about. To me it’s more about owning that identity and defining it for yourself vs the struggle?

What are some of your greatest moments and achievements since getting interested in photography?

Making friends and talking to other artists. Gaining confidence in myself and with my work. Better understanding what it’s about and what I can do to make it better. I have so many more things i’m hoping to accomplish! Working towards making those goals a reality!

Are there any tips that you would give up and coming photographers? Those that are interested in learning as a hobby or professionally.

Shoot! Shoot all the time! Shoot until you figure out what you’re interested in and why you’re interested in it, and then explore that. But mostly, just take lots and lots and lots of photos.

 

Words by Fabiola Ching

Image by Vivian Fu